dimanche 30 mai 2021

Card Money reproduction of the year 1749

 Hello,


As a follow-up to my article on the history of card money in New France, I completed the 1749 card money making, which took much longer than expected. I would like to share with you the steps and thoughts that led to the final result.


Reproduction of 2021 of card money of the year 1749
Création Mlle Canadienne
Coins reproduction from Quartermaster General Store




Let us first recall that the cards of this period are subject to a royal decree which lays down the rules of manufacture for card money, on March 2, 1729. The allowable denominations are 24 livres (pounds), 12 livres, 6 livres, 3 livres, 1 livre 10 sols (30 sols), 15 sols as well as 7sols and 6 denier. The values ​​of a card thus go exponentially, always being the double of the previous one.





The first goal is to determine whether the dimensions of the cards seem standardized or random. The cards have different dimensions depending on the values, the larger values ​​have the larger size cards. In addition, I notice that each card has an edge of a fairly similar dimension, varying between 5.8 and 5.6 cm. I also see that the cards of 30 sols and 15 sols are actually half of the ones of 24 and 12 livres. It will be of great use to me later.



Second step: determine a year for the reproduction

It was the easiest for me, in fact to avoid making an exhaustive list of the Controllers of the Marine Bureau in Quebec City, a list that does not exist on the internet, unlike the governors and intendants of New France. 1749 was the year selected because it is a year that has signed cards (the 24, 12, 6 and 3 livres) and initialed cards (the 30 sols, 15 sols and the 7 sols & 6 deniers). ), so no need to "invent" initials. The name of the controller of the Bureau de la Marine in Quebec for the year 1749 is Bréard for Jacques-Michel Bréard. Thanks to Jean-François Lozier, curator at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau for helping me identify it because it was impossible for me to read it.




Step three: Create the cardboard for the card money


Initially, I tried to recreate the cards one at a time by looking at the dimensions, given in the descriptions of the Musée de la civilisation. Out of curiosity, I compared the size of a reproduction of a playing card that I have with a 24 pound card and surprise! They have very comparable dimensions!



Reproduction of 18th century French playing card
Reproduction card money of 24 livres
Création Mlle Canadienne



I came to the conclusion that the cards were made from the same dimensions as the playing cards (possibly the standardization of card values occurred at the end of the first period of issuance of card money. ). After making a few 24 livres and 30 sols cards, I realize that the 30 sols are half of the 24 livres ones. 


Reproduction of  30 sols et 15 sols cards
Création Mlle Canadienne
Reproduction of 18th century French playing card


This supports my hypothesis that during the second issue of card money, the authorities wanted to resume a system of dimensions already known to the population.



As a reminder, there are two card values that are not present in the collections of the Musée de la civilization de Québec, those of 3 livres and those of 7 sols & 6 deniers.




For 3 livres cards, the assumption of its dimensions and shapes is relatively easy to make. Just look at the 24 and 12 livres cards which are the same size, only the 12 livres cards have chipped corners.


Reproduction of 24 livres et 12 livres cards
Création Mlle Canadienne


The same is true for cards of 30 sols and 15 sols. They are the same size (half of a 24 pound card) but the 15 sols card has chipped corners, unlike the 30 sols card.


Reproduction of  30 sols et 15 sols cards
Création Mlle Canadienne
Reproduction of 18th century French playing card


Following the logic that the higher value card has the corners intact and the next one has the corners chipped, I assumed that the 3 livres card was the same size as the 6 livres card, except that it also had chipped corners.



Reproduction of  six livres card  and hypothesis of reproduction of a 3 livres card
Création Mlle Canadienne

For the 7 sols & 6 denier card hypothesis, I noticed that a relatively square 6 livres card left a gap when superimposed on a playing card (or 24 livres card). From a material conservation perspective, I deduced that this void must be the size of this smallest value of card money.


Reproduction of  6 livres and
hypothesis of reproduction of a 7 sols & 6 deniers card
Création Mlle Canadienne
Reproduction of 18th century French playing card


I know that my work is manual and geometrically imperfect, but you see where my dimensional assumption for the smallest value of card money comes from. The cards preserved at the Musée de la civilisation also have a variability of 2 mm in width ... The principle is there.


Fourth step: recreate the seals of France and Navarre

This step was the most difficult in my opinion. Unlike the first wave of card money issuance that were made without the authorization of Versailles, from the second wave of card money that began in 1729, they were required to bear the arms of France and of Navarre. According to my observations, the seals used are different between the years 1729-1732 and after 1733. I decided to reproduce the seals which cover the longest period.



My first test was entirely artisanal, made from brass pipe. My engraving tool was unfortunately not as precise as I wanted. The result was disappointing to me, the seal of France, being a single fleur-de-lis, was impossible to identify and the seal of Navarre just as distressing.

Brass seals evoking the seals of France and Navarre
Création Mlle Canadienne



After making a digital drawing of the seals of France and Navarre, I turned to the internet and found a craftswoman making metal embossing seals, Ernesta from EAbelts on Etsy.


Reproductions of sceals of France and Navarre
Design Mlle Canadienne
Création EABelts



Step Five: Write the Cards and Forge the Signatures

At this stage, given the time it took me to make my first production of card money, I wondered. Were all the cards that were issued by the government of New France written by the Contrôleur au Bureau de la Marine or could he subcontract? Did governors and intendants have secretaries to officially forge their signatures to avoid these redundant and tiresome tasks? King Louis XIV had several secretaries to draft his official documents in place of the sovereign, and the secretaries of state (ministers) could sign them. Was the practice widespread in colonial administrations at the time? Despite strong suspicions, my questions remain unanswered.

This step is the one that brought me closest to the feelings that counterfeiters must have had when they made their fakes. Do the signatures really look like the originals? Is the difference easily identifiable?

The ink I used is cassel extract. I use a metallic dipping nib (19th century invention), having not yet acquired the technique to make a writing quill with a quill as in the 18th century.


Sixth and last step: affix the seals of France and Navarre

Equipped with my seals, a wooden board and a hammer, I produced some cacophony in my garage during a beautiful afternoon. Again, I wondered who was actually doing the seals on the cards, the administrators who have their signatures on them, or subordinates. I fear that these questions will remain unanswered.


Finally, I realized my dream of owning reproductions of card money!




Reproduction of 2021 of card money of the year 1749
Création Mlle Canadienne
Coins reproduction from Quartermaster General Store

Reflections

After this process, I wanted to compare my thoughts about card money. Were the proportions of the existing cards the same as those made on real cards? Did artist Henri Beau use the same proportions when making his reproductions? To reiterate, to my knowledge there is no card currency from the first card issuance period.

The values ​​documented by both archival and card money artifacts, on white cardboard, which I reproduced are as follows: 24 24 livres (pounds), 12 livres, 6 livres, 3 livres, 1 livre 10 sols (30 sols), 15 sols as well as 7sols and 6 denier. These denominations are based on multiples of 3. When looking at coins from the same period, they also follow this logic. The silver écu is worth 6 livres, the demi-écu is worth 3 livres, the louis d'or is 24 livres, the demi-louis is 12 livres and the double louis d'or is, unsurprisingly, 48 livres.

Let's take a closer look at the reproduction of the artist Henri Beau dating from the beginning of the 20th century.


Reproductions of card money by Henri Beau
Around 1900
Source: Bibliothèque et Archives Canada


The values illustrated by Henri Beau are 100 livres, 50 livres, 40 livres, 20 livres, 12 livres, 4 livres, 20 sols, 15 sols and 10 sols for those that I manage to decipher with the digitization of the document. Its dimensional assumptions are therefore not based on existing cards, as I believed. The values seem to represent more manipulation of money based on multiples of 5 (like the Canadian dollar) rather than multiples of 3 from money of the New France period.

The reflection on the dimensions and denominations of the card money cards dating from 1685 to 1714 continues ... Maybe I will do a project to reproduce card money from this period in the times to come and that will force me to come back to it in more depth.

Hope you enjoyed this article.

Mlle Canadienne

samedi 29 mai 2021

Reproduction de monnaie de cartes de l'année 1749

 Bonjour,


Pour faire suite à mon article sur l'histoire de la monnaie de cartes en Nouvelle-France, j'ai terminé la réalisation de monnaie de cartes de 1749, ce qui m'a pris beaucoup plus de temps que prévu. J'aimerais vous partager les étapes et réflexions qui ont mené au résultat final.


Reproduction de 2021 de monnaie de cartes de l'année 1749
Création Mlle Canadienne
Reproduction de monnaies venant de la boutique Quartermaster General Store


Rappelons d'abord que les cartes de cette période sont soumises à une ordonnance royale qui édicte les règles de fabrication pour la monnaie de cartes, le 2 mars 1729. Les coupures permises sont de 24 livres, 12 livres, 6 livres, 3 livres, 1 livre 10 sols (30 sols), 15 sols ainsi que 7 sols 6 deniers. Les valeurs d'une carte vont ainsi de manière exponentielle, étant toujours le double de la précédente. 




Première étape: analyse des cartes de la collection du musée de la civilisation de Québec

Le premier but est de déterminer si les dimensions des cartes semblent standardisées ou aléatoires. Les cartes ont des dimensions différentes en fonction des valeurs, les plus grosses valeurs ont les cartes de plus grandes dimensions. De plus je remarque que chaque carte a un bord d'une dimension assez similaire, variant entre 5.8 et 5.6 cm. Je constate aussi que les cartes de trente sols et de quinze sols sont en fait la moitié des cartes de 24 et 12 livres. Cela me sera fort utile plus tard.


Deuxième étape: déterminer une année pour faire la reproduction

C'était le plus simple pour moi, en fait pour éviter de faire une liste exhaustive des Contrôleurs du Bureau de la Marine à Québec, liste qui n'existe pas sur internet, contrairement aux gouverneurs et intendants de la Nouvelle-France. 1749 a été l'année sélectionnée car il s'agit d'une année qui a des cartes signées (les 24, 12, 6 et 3 livres) et des cartes paraphées (les 30 sols, 15 sols et les 7 sols & 6 deniers), donc pas besoin ''d'inventer'' des initiales. Le nom du contrôleur du Bureau de la Marine à Québec pour l'année 1749 est Bréard pour Jacques-Michel Bréard. Merci à Jean-François Lozier, conservateur au Musée Canadien de l'Histoire à Gatineau pour m'avoir aidé à l'identifier car il m'était impossible de le lire. 


Troisième étape: Créer les cartons pour la monnaie de cartes


Au départ, j'ai essayé de recréer les cartes une à la fois en regardant les dimensions, données dans les fiches descriptives du musée de la civilisation. Par curiosité, j'ai comparé la dimension d'une reproduction de carte à jouer que j'ai avec une carte de 24 livres et surprise! Elles ont des dimensions très comparables!



Reproduction de carte à jouer 18e siècle
Reproduction de carte de 24 livres
Création Mlle Canadienne



J'en suis venue à la conclusion que les cartes étaient fabriquées à partir des mêmes dimensions que les cartes à jouer (possiblement la standardisation des valeurs des cartes s'est produite à la fin de la première période d'émission de la monnaie de cartes).  Après avoir fait quelques cartes de 24 livres et de 30 sols, je réalise que les 30 sols sont la moitié de celles de 24 livres. 


Reproduction de cartes de 30 sols et 15 sols
Création Mlle Canadienne
Reproduction de carte à jouer 18e siècle


Ceci appuie mon hypothèse que lors de la deuxième émission de monnaie de cartes, les autorités ont voulu reprendre un système de dimensions déjà connu de la population. 


Pour rappel, il y a deux valeurs de cartes qui ne sont pas présentes dans les collections du musée de la civilisation de Québec, celles de 3 livres et celles de 7 sols & 6 deniers. 


Pour les cartes de 3 livres, l'hypothèse de ses dimensions et formes est relativement facile à faire. Il suffit de voir les cartes de 24 et 12 livres qui sont de mêmes dimensions, seules celles de 12 livres ont les coins écornés.


Reproduction de cartes de 24 livres et 12 livres
Création Mlle Canadienne

La même constatation est de mise pour les cartes de 30 sols et 15 sols. Elles sont de mêmes dimensions (la moitié d'une carte de 24 livres) mais la carte de 15 sols a les coins écornés, contrairement à la carte de 30 sols.

Reproduction de cartes de 30 sols et 15 sols
Création Mlle Canadienne
Reproduction de carte à jouer 18e siècle

Suivant la logique que la carte de valeur plus élevée a les coins intacts et la suivante a les coins écornés, j'ai fait l'hypothèse que la carte de 3 livres était de mêmes dimensions que celle de 6 livres, à la différence qu'elle avait aussi les coins écornés.



Reproduction de carte de six livres et hypothèse de reproduction de carte de trois livres
Création Mlle Canadienne

Pour l'hypothèse de la carte de 7 sols et 6 deniers, j'ai remarqué qu'une carte de 6 livres, relativement carrée, laissait un espace lorsque superposée a une carte à jouer (ou une carte de 24 livres). Dans une optique de conservation du matériel, j'en ai déduit que ce vide devait être la dimension de cette plus petite valeur de monnaie de cartes.


Reproduction de cartes de 6 livres et
hypothèse de reproduction de carte de 7 sols & 6 deniers 
Création Mlle Canadienne
Reproduction de carte à jouer 18e siècle

Bon, mon travail est manuel et imparfait géométriquement, j'en ai conscience, mais vous voyez d'où vient mon hypothèse de dimensions pour la plus petite valeur de monnaie de cartes. Les cartes préservées au musée de la civilisation ont aussi une variabilité de 2 mm en largeur... Le principe est là.


Quatrième étape: recréer les sceaux de France et de Navarre

Cette étape a été la plus difficile à mon avis. Contrairement à la première vague d'émission de monnaie de cartes qui étaient fabriquées sans l'autorisation de Versailles, à partir de la deuxième vague de monnaie de cartes en 1729, celles-ci ont l'obligation de porter les armes de France et de Navarre. Selon mes observations, les sceaux utilisés sont différents entre les années 1729-1732 et après 1733. J'ai décidé de reproduire les sceaux qui couvrent la plus longue période.


Mon premier essai était entièrement artisanal, fait à base de tuyau de laiton. Mon outil à graver n'était malheureusement pas aussi précis que je le voulais. Le résultat était à mes yeux décevant,  le sceau de France, étant une unique fleur de lys, était impossible à identifier et le sceau de Navarre tout aussi désolant. 

Sceaux de laiton évoquant les sceaux de France et de Navarre
Création Mlle Canadienne



Après avoir fait un dessin numérique des sceaux de France et de Navarre, je me suis tournée vers internet et j'ai trouvé une artisane faisant des sceaux à embosser le métal, Ernesta de EAbelts sur Etsy.


Reproductions des sceaux de France et de Navarre
Design Mlle Canadienne
Création EABelts



Cinquième étape: Écrire les cartes et contrefaire les signatures

À cette étape, compte tenu du temps que cela m'a pris pour réaliser ma première production de monnaie de cartes, je me suis questionnée. Est-ce que toutes les cartes qui ont été émises par le gouvernement de la Nouvelle-France ont été écrites par le Contrôleur du Bureau de la Marine ou bien pouvait-il faire de la sous-traitance? Est-ce que les gouverneurs et intendants avaient des secrétaires pour officiellement contrefaire leur signature pour leur éviter ces tâches redondantes et lassantes? Le roi Louis XIV avait plusieurs secrétaires pour rédiger ses documents officiels à la place du souverain, et les secrétaires d'État (ministres), pouvaient les signer. La pratique était-elle répandue dans les administrations coloniales à l'époque? Malgré de fortes suspicions, mes questions restent sans réponses.

Cette étape est celle qui m'a le plus rapprochée des sentiments que les faussaires devaient éprouver lorsqu'ils fabriquaient leurs contrefaçons. Est-ce que les signatures ressemblent vraiment aux originales? Est-ce que la différence est facilement identifiable?

L'encre que j'ai utilisée est de l'extrait de cassel. J'utilise une plume à tremper métallique (invention du 19ième siècle), n'ayant pas encore acquis la technique pour fabriquer une plume à écrire avec une plume comme au 18ième siècle.


Sixième et dernière étape: apposer les sceaux de France et de Navarre

Munie de mes sceaux, d'une planche en bois et d'un marteau, j'ai produit de la cacophonie dans mon garage durant un bel après-midi. Encore une fois, je me suis demandée qui réellement réalisait les sceaux sur les cartes, les administrateurs qui ont leur signature sur elles ou des subalternes. Je crains fort que ces questions demeureront sans réponses.


Finalement, j'ai réalisé mon rêve de posséder des reproductions de monnaie de cartes!


Reproduction de 2021 de monnaie de cartes de l'année 1749
Création Mlle Canadienne
Reproduction de monnaies venant de la boutique Quartermaster General Store

Réflexions

Après ce processus, j'ai voulu comparer mes réflexions à propos de la monnaie de cartes. Est-ce que les proportions des cartes existantes étaient les mêmes avec celles fabriquées sur des vraies cartes? Est-ce que l'artiste Henri Beau a utilisé les mêmes proportions lorsqu'il a fait ses reproductions? Pour répéter, il n'existe à ma connaissance aucune monnaie de cartes de la première période d'émission de cartes. 
Les valeurs documentées à la fois par les archives et les artéfacts de la monnaie de cartes, sur carton blanc, que j'ai reproduites sont les suivantes: 24 livres, 12 livres, 6 livres, 3 livres, 1 livre 10 sols (30 sols), 15 sols ainsi que 7 sols 6 deniers. Ces coupures sont basées sur des multiples de 3. Lorsqu'on regarde les pièces de monnaie de la même période, elles obéissent aussi à cette logique. L'écu d'argent vaut 6 livres, le demi-écu vaut 3 livres, le louis d'or vaut 24 livres, le demi-louis vaut 12 livres et le double louis d'or vaut, sans surprise, 48 livres.

Regardons de plus près la reproduction de l'artiste Henri Beau datant du début du XXe siècle.


Reproductions de monnaie de cartes par l'artiste Henri Beau
Vers 1900
Source: Bibliothèque et Archives Canada


Les coupures illustrées par Henri Beau sont de 100 livres, 50 livres, 40 livres, 20 livres, 12 livres, 4 livres, 20 sols, 15 sols et 10 sols pour celles que j'arrive à déchiffrer avec la numérisation du document.  Ses hypothèses de dimensions ne sont donc pas basées sur les cartes existantes, comme je le croyais. Les valeurs semblent plus représenter la manipulation d'argent basée sur des multiples de 5 (comme le dollar canadien) plutôt que sur les multiples de 3 des livres anciennes.

La réflexion sur les dimensions et coupures des cartes de monnaie de cartes datant de 1685 à 1714 se poursuit... Peut-être ferai-je un projet de reproduction de monnaie de cartes de cette période dans les temps à venir et que cela me forcera à y revenir plus en profondeur.

J'espère que vous aurez apprécié cet article. 

Mlle Canadienne




samedi 15 mai 2021

From Filles du Roy to the French and Indian War, Chapter 5: the robe à la française 1740-1763

Hello,


Welcome to the penultimate chapter on the evolution of women's fashions during the New France period, dealing with ''robe à la française''. The decade 1740 was the scene of the War of the Austrian Succession, which in 1745 saw the fortress of Louisbourg fall for the first time into the hands of the British before being exchanged for the Austrian Netherlands (now Belgium) during the negotiations leading to the peace treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle of 1748.


The characteristic pleats of the robe à la française were inherited from the robe volante, which was described in Chapter 4 of this series. The originality of the robe à la française is that henceforth the waist is emphasized by the dress, whereas it was concealed under ample pleats with the robe volante.




Here is one of the first tables where the French dress with the waist underline appears:

Le déjeuner
Artist François Boucher
1739
Collection Musée du Louvres


The emphasis on size, and its thinness, is undeniable in the following tables:


Madame d'Epinay et Madame de Meaux
Artist: Louis Carrogis dit Carmontelle
Around 1750-1760
Collection Musée Condée, Chantilly
Source: La Tribune de l'Art

Portrait of a woman, said to be Madame Chalres Simon Favart, born Marie Justine Benoîte Duronceray
Artist: François Hubert Drouais
1757
Collection MET Museum




The famous back folds of the robe à la française, which were later called Watteau pleats, were only called ''plis'' in French (pleats, I presume in English) in the 18th century. Jean Antoine Watteau did not live long enough to see what we call the robe à la française, because he died at the beginning of the fashion of the robe volante, that is in 1721. The robe volante differs from the previous one, the robe volante, by the sharp tightening of the waist on the boned body.

The painting of the Toilette by François Boucher shows the maid from behind. The pleats in her dress are slightly wider than her waist, increasing the illusion of thinness when viewed from the side or front. In addition, her dress is worn '' retroussée dans les poches '' (rolled up in the pockets), a style that facilitated movement and avoided soiling the bottom of the dresses in the muddy streets of the cities. Many see this style as a prelude to the so-called promenade dress ''à la Polonaise'' of the years 1770-1780.

La toilette
Artist: François Boucher
1742
Museum Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid




The ''manteau de robe'' (coat of the robe) of the française is always open at the front over a stomach piece and the outside skirt. Most of the time, the ''manteau de robe'', the stomacher and the formal skirt are made from the same fabrics. Sometimes the stomacher is a different but complementary color, matching the accessories for the sleeves or hair.

Portrait of a woman holding a cup
Anonymous French style ,
18th century
Collection du Musée d'Art et d'Industrie André Diligent
Source: Ministère de la culture, France

Portrait de Madame de Sorquainville
Artist: Jean Baptiste Perronneau 
1749
Collection of Musée du Louvre

Portrait of a noble woman
Artiste: Donat Nonnotte
18th century
Private collection
Source: De Artibus Sequanis



Occasionally, some robe à la française are edged with furs. Considering that New France was one of the main suppliers of furs to Europe, it is more than likely that these came from North America.

Portrait of Mme de Brosse, daughter M. Briasson, échevin Lyonnais
Artist: Donat Nonnotte
1758
Private collection
Source: Artnet

Portrait of a woman said to be the Marquise de Beauharnais,
Artist: Circle of François-Hubert Drouais
Vers 1750-1760
Private Collection
Source: Christie's




 


As for the hairstyles, you might have noticed, these are relatively unchanged from the robe volante. The head takes only a little volume, the hair is powdered and pulled up on the head in a flat bun under a cap. Some headdresses cover the head more than others.

Portrait of a woman with a dog
Artist: Donnat Nonnotte
18th century
Private collection
Source: Artnet

La coeffeuse
Artist: Dominique Sornique after Étienne Jeaurat
18th century
Collection Rijskmuseum

Interestingly, the ''coeffeuse'' (hairdresser) in this engraving presents a bonnet to the lady she is visiting rather than shaping out her hair. Like the maid in François Boucher's painting '' la toilette '' above, the maid lady in this engraving wears her dress '' retroussée dans les poches '', a way of preserving the appearance of the bottom of the the dress while walking in the muddy streets of the cities.



Wealthier ladies can also style their hair "en cheveux" (in hair), that is to say in small curls always close to the head. Here are two examples of ladies with "en cheveux".



Portrait of the Marquise de Gast
Artiste: Donat Nonnotte
Around 1740-1750
Private collection
Source: Artnet

Portrait of Claudine Flachon, daughter of Claude Flachon, échevin de Lyon
Artist: Donat Nonnotte
1750
Private Collection
Source: Artnet

Moreover, the expression styled in hair is used in the correspondence of Elisabeth Bégon in her letter of January 27, 1750, where she describes the adjustments of her granddaughter during her first official social outing in La Rochelle:

 ''Si tu eusses vu ta fille hier, cher fils, tu serais resté comme elle le fit à la vue de ce damas rose que tu lui donnas. Elle était coiffée en cheveux au mieux, avec un corps neuf qui lui fait la taille belle, de bonne grâce, et partit bien contente avec le la peine, cependant, de ne savoir point danser...''
''If you had seen your daughter yesterday, dear son, you would have remained as she did at the sight of this pink damask that you gave her. She was dressed in hair at best, with a new body which gives her a good figure, with good grace, and left very happy with the pain, however, of not knowing how to dance ... ''

Remember that Elisabeth Bégon is a letter-writer born in Canada who had decided to move to France.


The fashion for high hairstyles did not start again timidly until the 1760s to reach unmatched heights (literally and figuratively) with Marie-Antoinette in the 1770s. An emblematic hairstyle of this period is the coiffure à la belle poule.



One cannot evoke fashion in the middle of the 18th century without speaking of the famous Madame de Pompadour, mistress of King Louis XV.

Sketch for a portrait de Mme de Pompadour
Artist: François Boucher
around 1750
Collection Waddesdon Manor, Starhemberg Room
Source: Wikimedia Commons




Portrait of Madame de Pompadour
Artist François Boucher
1759
Collection Wallace, Londre
Source: Wallace Collection Blog

On the two portraits of François Boucher selected, Mme de Pompadour wears a stomacher  decorated with ''échelle de rubans''  as is called the set of ribbon bows. Ribbons attached to the sleeves are the same color as those on the ''échelle''. Underneath the sleeves are engageantes in lace which gives volume to the sleeve. The ''manteau-de-robe'' (coat gown), the skirt and the frills are made of the same fabric. She is dressed in hair, that is to say that she does not wear a cap.
 



Let us recall that the portrait of Mme de Rigaud de Vaudreuil, wife of the Governor-General of Canada, painted in France, represents her wearing a robe à la française of gilded brocade on a blue background.




Portrait of Madame Pierre de Rigaud de Vaudreuil, born Jeanne-Charlotte de Fleury Deschambault,
Attributed to Donat Nonotte 
around 1753-1755
Copy of Henri Beau
Début du XXe siècle
Bibliothèque et Archives Canada

Less known, there is a second portrait of this noble lady of New France, where she also wears a robe à la française and plays the guitar.

Madame de Rigaud de Vaudreuil, femme du commandant du Canada
Louis Carrogis dit Carmontelle
Around 1753-1755
Collection of Musée Condé

In 2019, I wrote an article on the life course of this lady. If you are interested, it is available here: Jeanne Charlotte de Fleury Deschambault - The woman behind the portrait.

The French dress was in vogue for about 35 years, from around 1740 to 1775. The originals that still exist today are mostly from the end of this period. Here are some copies of the period interests us.

Robe à la française
Around 1740
Musée des Arts décoratifs
Source: Google Arts & Culture




Robe à la française
Around 1740
Musée des Arts décoratifs
Source: Google Arts & Culture


robe à la française 
Around 1735
Private collection
Source: Thierry de Maigret commissaire priseur

robe à la française 
Around 1735
Private collection
Source: Thierry de Maigret commissaire priseur


Robe à la française
around 1760
Collection MET museum



Strangely, I have found few paintings or engravings illustrating a landscape or an overview of this period on which it is easy to identify the robe à la française. It must be said that the majority of the ladies of this period come out with a small cape, which makes it difficult to appreciate the dress below.


Vue du Château de Versailles du côté de l'orangerie
Artist: Jacques Rigaud
Between 1729 and 1752
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles
Detail of Vue du Château de Versailles du côté de l'orangerie
Artist: Jacques Rigaud
Between 1729 and 1752
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles


Detail of Vue du Château de Versailles du côté de l'orangerie
Artist: Jacques Rigaud
Between 1729 and 1752
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles





Vue du petit château de Choisy-le-Roy du côté de la cour
Artist: Denis-Pierre-Jean Papillon de la Ferté
1760
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles


Detail of
Vue du petit château de Choisy-le-Roy du côté de la cour
Artist: Denis-Pierre-Jean Papillon de la Ferté
1760
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles





Vue du petit château de Choisy-le-Roy
Artist: Denis-Pierre-Jean Papillon de la Ferté
1760
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles




Detail of Vue du petit château de Choisy-le-Roy
Artist: Denis-Pierre-Jean Papillon de la Ferté
1760
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles
Detail of Vue du petit château de Choisy-le-Roy
Artist: Denis-Pierre-Jean Papillon de la Ferté
1760
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles


Detail of Vue du petit château de Choisy-le-Roy
Artiste: Denis-Pierre-Jean Papillon de la Ferté
1760
Collection des Châteaux de Versailles

In Richard Short's engravings appears a lady who appears to be wearing a robe à la française ''retroussée dans les poches''. Unless it's a half dress, the quality of the scan doesn't allow me to decide between the two hypotheses. Richard Short made a series of engravings in 1761 reflecting the devastation of the war on Quebec City after the French and Indian War.


Vue de la cathédrale, du collège des Jésuites et de l'Église des Récollets prise de la porte du Gouvernement
Artists: Richard Short et Pierre-Charles Canot
1761
Collection of Musée National des Beaux-Arts de Québec


Detail of 
Vue de la cathédrale, du collège des Jésuites et de l'Église des Récollets prise de la porte du Gouvernement
Artists: Richard Short et Pierre-Charles Canot
1761
Collection of Musée National des Beaux-Arts de Québec

Another print of Shorts from the same series clearly shows a robe à la française ''retroussée dans les poches''.

Vue du Palais épiscopal et de ses ruines, ainsi qu'elles paraissent en descendant à la Basse-Ville
Artist: Ignace Fougeron after Richard Short
1761
Collection of Musée National des Beaux-Arts de Québec

Detail of
Vue du Palais épiscopal et de ses ruines, ainsi qu'elles paraissent en descendant à la Basse-Ville
Artist: Ignace Fougeron d'après Richard Short
1761
Collection of Musée National des Beaux-Arts de Québec



It was on September 8, 1760 with the surrender of Montreal that New France fell under British military rule. It is a temporary regime and the North American continent must wait until the end of the conflict with the Treaty of Paris of 1763 to formalize the cession of the territory of New France to England.

This is how the penultimate article on fashion in New France ends. The last will relate to the clothes of the ''habitantes'' (inhabitants) and the peasant women during this period 1663-1763.

Mlle Canadienne









Card Money reproduction of the year 1749

 Hello, As a follow-up to my article on the history of card money in New France , I completed the 1749 card money making, which took much lo...